'Nutrients and gene expression'

18 March 2017, Cavendish Conference Centre, London

Expert speaker

Course gluten-free lunch

Exhibitors

CPD hours

Professor Giovanni Scapagnini
 

*Only 20 places remaining*


9.00 – 9.30
Registration for BANT AGM 

Enjoy teas, herbal teas, coffee, and seasonal cut fruit during registration. *Please Note* This is for the BANT Annual General Meeting only. If you are a BANT member and would like to attend the AGM, please click here to register.


9.30 – 11.30
BANT AGM

With crucial reviews of activity from directors on how the organisation has performed against its strategic objectives, as well as looking ahead for activity for 2017/2018, BANT is calling upon all members to put the 18 March in their diary for its Annual General Meeting, in conjunction with the CAM Conference. BANT members can click here to register.


11.30 – 12.30
Registration for CAM Conference

Registration for those only attending ‘Nutrients & Gene Expression’. Enjoy teas, herbal teas, coffee, and seasonal cut fruit during this time.


12.30 – 13.30
Giovanni Scapagnini, MD, PhD

Nutritional signals that modulate ageing and healthspan: a complex regulatory network for nutrigenomics research

An extensive literature describes the positive impact of dietary phytochemicals on overall health and longevity. Although the exact mechanisms by which phytochemicals promote these effects remain to be elucidated, several reports have shown their ability to stimulate various mechanisms associated with ageing process, including modulation of NAD+/sirtuin pathway and xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Dietary phytochemicals include a large group of nonnutrients compounds from a wide range of plant-derived foods and chemical classes. Over the last decade, remarkable progress has been made to realise that chronic, low-grade inflammation and redox unbalance are critical aspects for the development of age-related diseases. Read more...

 Despite the translational gap between basic and clinical research, the current understanding of the molecular interactions between phytochemicals and oxy/inflammatory response could help in designing effective nutritional strategies to delay the onset of chronic diseases and improve healthy ageing. Moreover, dietary phytochemicals have provided unique targets for underlying mechanisms of ageing. Among these targets, SIRT1 has emerged as a good candidate to counteract oxidative stress and inflammation. Indeed, SIRT1 has several effects that may turn out to be a benefit given the multifactorial pathogenesis of ageing and ageing associated-disease. In this context, our and other laboratories, have highlighted the relevance of specific dietary phytochemicals to activate SIRT1 and also for the maintenance of the efficiency of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, a central mechanism for adaptive responses to oxidative stress and inflammation. This presentation will focus on the effects of some dietary phytochemicals on ageing and longevity with particular focus on dietary patterns of long-lived populations but also on the importance of nutrient-sensing pathways that have a pivotal role in the regulation of oxi-inflammation and lifespan. 
About Prof. Giovanni Scapagnini

Associate Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology, at the University of Molise, Italy, Prof Scapagnini is an internationally recognised expert in biological ageing mechanisms, specialising in brain ageing, and in functional nutrition. He is vice-president, founding member and member of the board of directors of the Italian Nutraceutical Society (SINUT), author of more than 100 publications in international peerreviewed scientific journals and organiser of many international congresses involved with the biological mechanisms of ageing.

What is less well-known about him is that early in his career he worked for four years at the Institute of Human Virology in Baltimore, Maryland, founded by the famous Dr Robert Gallo, with whom Scapagnini was involved in the testing of polyphenols extracted from green tea. He is an acknowledged expert on polyphenols and other dietary molecules, some of which do not act quite as we think they do. In a 2002 paper, Prof Scapagnini and colleagues outlined the case for the possible prevention of what appears to be the coming worldwide epidemic of Alzheimer’s and dementia through the use of nutritionallyderived antioxidants (J Nutr Biochem 2002). In an Italian interview, he was introduced with the words: “Giovanni Scapagnini: for him polyphenols have no secrets”.


13.30 – 14.30
Lunch

Enjoy a three course gluten-free buffet lunch, with time to network with peers and exhibitors.


14.30 – 15.30
Giovanni Scapagnini, MD, PhD

Nutritional signals that modulate ageing and healthspan: a complex regulatory network for nutrigenomics research

An extensive literature describes the positive impact of dietary phytochemicals on overall health and longevity. Although the exact mechanisms by which phytochemicals promote these effects remain to be elucidated, several reports have shown their ability to stimulate various mechanisms associated with ageing process, including modulation of NAD+/sirtuin pathway and xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Dietary phytochemicals include a large group of nonnutrients compounds from a wide range of plant-derived foods and chemical classes. Over the last decade, remarkable progress has been made to realise that chronic, low-grade inflammation and redox unbalance are critical aspects for the development of age-related diseases. Read more...

 Despite the translational gap between basic and clinical research, the current understanding of the molecular interactions between phytochemicals and oxy/inflammatory response could help in designing effective nutritional strategies to delay the onset of chronic diseases and improve healthy ageing. Moreover, dietary phytochemicals have provided unique targets for underlying mechanisms of ageing. Among these targets, SIRT1 has emerged as a good candidate to counteract oxidative stress and inflammation. Indeed, SIRT1 has several effects that may turn out to be a benefit given the multifactorial pathogenesis of ageing and ageing associated-disease. In this context, our and other laboratories, have highlighted the relevance of specific dietary phytochemicals to activate SIRT1 and also for the maintenance of the efficiency of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, a central mechanism for adaptive responses to oxidative stress and inflammation. This presentation will focus on the effects of some dietary phytochemicals on ageing and longevity with particular focus on dietary patterns of long-lived populations but also on the importance of nutrient-sensing pathways that have a pivotal role in the regulation of oxi-inflammation and lifespan. 
About Prof. Giovanni Scapagnini

Associate Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology, at the University of Molise, Italy, Prof Scapagnini is an internationally recognised expert in biological ageing mechanisms, specialising in brain ageing, and in functional nutrition. He is vice-president, founding member and member of the board of directors of the Italian Nutraceutical Society (SINUT), author of more than 100 publications in international peerreviewed scientific journals and organiser of many international congresses involved with the biological mechanisms of ageing.

What is less well-known about him is that early in his career he worked for four years at the Institute of Human Virology in Baltimore, Maryland, founded by the famous Dr Robert Gallo, with whom Scapagnini was involved in the testing of polyphenols extracted from green tea. He is an acknowledged expert on polyphenols and other dietary molecules, some of which do not act quite as we think they do. In a 2002 paper, Prof Scapagnini and colleagues outlined the case for the possible prevention of what appears to be the coming worldwide epidemic of Alzheimer’s and dementia through the use of nutritionallyderived antioxidants (J Nutr Biochem 2002). In an Italian interview, he was introduced with the words: “Giovanni Scapagnini: for him polyphenols have no secrets”.


15.30 – 16.00
Refreshments

A short break in the presentation for delegates to enjoy some refreshments.


16.00 – 17.00
Giovanni Scapagnini, MD, PhD

Nutritional signals that modulate ageing and healthspan: a complex regulatory network for nutrigenomics research

And a Q&A session

An extensive literature describes the positive impact of dietary phytochemicals on overall health and longevity. Although the exact mechanisms by which phytochemicals promote these effects remain to be elucidated, several reports have shown their ability to stimulate various mechanisms associated with ageing process, including modulation of NAD+/sirtuin pathway and xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Dietary phytochemicals include a large group of nonnutrients compounds from a wide range of plant-derived foods and chemical classes. Over the last decade, remarkable progress has been made to realise that chronic, low-grade inflammation and redox unbalance are critical aspects for the development of age-related diseases. Read more...

 Despite the translational gap between basic and clinical research, the current understanding of the molecular interactions between phytochemicals and oxy/inflammatory response could help in designing effective nutritional strategies to delay the onset of chronic diseases and improve healthy ageing. Moreover, dietary phytochemicals have provided unique targets for underlying mechanisms of ageing. Among these targets, SIRT1 has emerged as a good candidate to counteract oxidative stress and inflammation. Indeed, SIRT1 has several effects that may turn out to be a benefit given the multifactorial pathogenesis of ageing and ageing associated-disease. In this context, our and other laboratories, have highlighted the relevance of specific dietary phytochemicals to activate SIRT1 and also for the maintenance of the efficiency of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, a central mechanism for adaptive responses to oxidative stress and inflammation. This presentation will focus on the effects of some dietary phytochemicals on ageing and longevity with particular focus on dietary patterns of long-lived populations but also on the importance of nutrient-sensing pathways that have a pivotal role in the regulation of oxi-inflammation and lifespan. 
About Prof. Giovanni Scapagnini

Associate Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology, at the University of Molise, Italy, Prof Scapagnini is an internationally recognised expert in biological ageing mechanisms, specialising in brain ageing, and in functional nutrition. He is vice-president, founding member and member of the board of directors of the Italian Nutraceutical Society (SINUT), author of more than 100 publications in international peerreviewed scientific journals and organiser of many international congresses involved with the biological mechanisms of ageing.

What is less well-known about him is that early in his career he worked for four years at the Institute of Human Virology in Baltimore, Maryland, founded by the famous Dr Robert Gallo, with whom Scapagnini was involved in the testing of polyphenols extracted from green tea. He is an acknowledged expert on polyphenols and other dietary molecules, some of which do not act quite as we think they do. In a 2002 paper, Prof Scapagnini and colleagues outlined the case for the possible prevention of what appears to be the coming worldwide epidemic of Alzheimer’s and dementia through the use of nutritionallyderived antioxidants (J Nutr Biochem 2002). In an Italian interview, he was introduced with the words: “Giovanni Scapagnini: for him polyphenols have no secrets”.


17.00
Day finish

‘Nutrients and Gene Expression’ will finish at 17.00


Guarantee your place

This CAM Conference in collaboration with BANT is expected to sell out quickly, so we recommend you book your place as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.

*Book now for only £95 (inc.VAT), with a multiple booking discount available for booking more than one event and additional discounts available for members of BANT, other associations and students*

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